Selchow and Righter/Hasbro has released another game in the Scrabble® series of word games: Super Scrabble. Unlike their previous efforts to 'gimmick' the brand, this game is actually a reasonable enhancement idea, preserving the simplicity of the original game while renewing it.

Super Scrabble's premise is simply: "Take Scrabble, and double it.". That is, there are approximately twice as many squares on the board (it's now 21x21), and there are twice as many tiles to play with (they've taken the distribution from the original set, and simply doubled the number of tiles of each letter (including blanks)). Obviously, the new, larger board means more premium squares, and they've extended out to Quad-letter and -word scores. Any ten-letter words with a Q and two Zs out there?

For those who have an interest in optical illusions, Akiyoshi's Illusion Page has some, with an explanation of why they "work" (PDF).

Today begins the Year of the Rooster on the Chinese zodiac and calendar. Happy Chinese New Year!

From today's New York Times - I originally saw it in the Dead Tree Edition, but it's on nytimes.com, too... http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/03/technology/circuits/03chef.htm (requires free login)

HOMARO CANTU'S maki look a lot like the sushi rolls served at other upscale restaurants: pristine, coin-size disks stuffed with lumps of fresh crab and rice and wrapped in shiny nori. They also taste like sushi, deliciously fishy and seaweedy.

But the sushi made by Mr. Cantu, the 28-year-old executive chef at Moto in Chicago, often contains no fish. It is prepared on a Canon i560 inkjet printer rather than a cutting board. He prints images of maki on pieces of edible paper made of soybeans and cornstarch, using organic, food-based inks of his own concoction. He then flavors the back of the paper, which is ordinarily used to put images onto birthday cakes, with powdered soy and seaweed seasonings.

more at the URI...

Niftycool!

Nov. 27th, 2004 11:31 am
Ganked from [personal profile] gridlore: http://www.cyphic.net/zoomquilt/zoom.htm

Edited 1/1/05: Seems that Joe Public is no longer authorized to view this. Damn. It was niftycool!

Edited 3/18/05: it's been found again, by [profile] dewhitton at http://www.eviltree.de/zoomquilt/zoom.htm and more info and a downloadable screensaver-for-Windows version at http://zoomquilt.nikkki.net

Reposted so most of you will see it; the way it got posted last time, it won't show up on your Friends page...

For the past couple of weeks, I've been going twice a week to physical therapy for some minor back problems; I managed to do something that my body wasn't designed to do, and it protested a little too long.  That's neither here nor there; the prescription - plus a little bit of 'hey, when the body feels wrong, it's trying to tell you something' consciousness, and I'm OK now.

Part of the PT was ultrasonic massage.  Which involved siting the 'electrodes', placing a warm, moist towel over them, and then putting a gel-pad on top of that.  The gel-pad was fairly dense, and meant that there was noticeable weight on my back.  The whole process was quite pleasant, and I seem to be in good shape now.

But that gel-pad got me thinking: When I'm lying in bed - asleep or not - I'll opt for keeping the temperature lower than normal and adding additional layers of blanket, in preference to keeping the temperature at a comfortable level and using only a light blanket or a topsheet.  A brief bit of chat on #C suggests that other people opt for the extra layers - and their weight - as well.

I'm curious, and would appreciate your thoughts: Why?  Is this some sort of hindbrain response, buried so deep in our history that there's no real hope of figuring out why, or can people put a reason to why they like the extra weight/layers?  Or is it as overwhelmingly popular as I think it is, at all?  If you don't feel this way, I'd like to hear that, as well, and why not.  And feel free to spread the question around; it's a public entry.

For the past couple of weeks, I've been going twice a week to physical therapy for some minor back problems; I managed to do something that my body wasn't designed to do, and it protested a little too long.  That's neither here nor there; the prescription - plus a little bit of 'hey, when the body feels wrong, it's trying to tell you something' consciousness, and I'm OK now.

Part of the PT was ultrasonic massage.  Which involved siting the 'electrodes', placing a warm, moist towel over them, and then putting a gel-pad  on top of that.  The gel-pad was fairly dense, and meant that there was noticeable weight on my back.  The whole process was quite pleasant, and I seem to be in good shape now.

But that gel-pad got me thinking: When I'm lying in bed - asleep or not - I'll opt for keeping the temperature lower than normal and adding additional layers of blanket, in preference to keeping the temperature at a comfortable level and using only a light blanket or a topsheet.  A brief bit of chat on #C suggests that other people opt for the extra layers - and their weight - as well.

I'm curious, and would appreciate your thoughts: Why?  Is this some sort of hindbrain response, buried so deep in our history that there's no real hope of figuring out why, or can people put a reason to why they like the extra weight?  Or is it as overwhelmingly popular as I think it is, at all?  If you don't feel this way, I'd like to hear that, as well, and why not.  And feel free to spread the question around; it's a public entry.

Mapmeme

Oct. 9th, 2004 08:20 am
Added a friend to my list today; went browsing his journal, and found this...

I'm trying to get all my Livejournal friends' locations plotted on a map - please add your location starting with this form.
Username:
(Then get your friends to!)

Profile

freetrav

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