jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley
I keep a mental list of several people I enjoy reading on the internet, but who I will not engage even in innocent ways due to willful misinterpretation in the past.

Gathering storm

Jul. 24th, 2017 07:43 am
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

Air temperature 54 F, calm, mostly cloudy. Rain later, brought by incoming visitors. Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war!

Interesting Links for 24-07-2017

Jul. 24th, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker

Kid Killers

Jul. 24th, 2017 05:58 am
supergee: (noose)
[personal profile] supergee
Nine toys my generation* survived.
*Well, most of us, anyway.

Thanx to File 770

(no subject)

Jul. 24th, 2017 03:10 am
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
New type of soft, growing robot created

On Teaching, but Not Loving, Jane Austen

The 19th-Century Lithuanians Who Smuggled Books to Save Their Language

When Young Chinese Ask, ‘What’s Your Sign?’ They Don’t Mean Dragon or Rat

How Checkers Was Solved

'Super Producer' Donates Gallons of Her Breast Milk to Feed Other People's Kids

Balls Out: The Weird Story of the Great Truck Nuts War

The Lonely Lives of Dolphin Lice

Lemon juice has long come in containers shaped like lemons.

When Girls Studied Planets and the Skies Had No Limits

A Search for the Flavor of a Beloved Childhood Medicine

North Dakota’s Norway Prison Experiment

What's It Really Like To Work In A Prison Goat Milk Farm? We Asked Inmates (The issue isn't the work, it's the pay. Pay them actual minimum wage. If you don't want them to use that money, require them to save most of it for when they are released. Even if you don't want to pay them, it seems obvious that not doing so drives down everybody else's wages.)

Cooling the tube – Engineering heat out of the Underground

The Kitten Rental Program is Saving Lives (It's all in the marketing ♥)

When New York City Rioted Over Hamlet Being Too British

Sean Spicer stole a mini-fridge from White House staffers (One can only hope they are now able to reclaim it.)

In South Sudan, a child soldier long thought dead comes back

Schumer, Gillibrand Co-Sponsor Senate Bill That Would Make Boycotting Israel A Felony (Oh, ffs. You can have a perfectly rational reason for criticizing specific policies taken by the Israeli government without hating or even disliking: Jews, Israelis, and/or the modern nation-state of Israel. And I voted for these people! Oh, uh... don't read the comments. Sheesh.)

Israel's struggle to integrate ultra-Orthodox and Arabs raises economic fears

Disabled and disdained: In rural America, some towns are divided between those who work and those who don’t

For Ethiopia’s Underemployed Youth, Life Can Center on a Leaf

How smugglers use trucks with sometimes deadly results

Protecting our children from climate change might take more than just cutting emissions
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Defending Their Own
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 2 of 6
word count (story only): 1449


:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, and the Mercedes subset, while taking the “Road Trip” in an entirely new direction. ::


Pay Special Attention: People who have been profiting from human trafficking have parts of their reality (and sometimes their bodies) folded into several sharp points which may not match any previously known 'safe' configuration. ::




Joshua had just turned toward the nearest stairwell when G called, “Dad?”

“There was an injury,” he responded immediately. “Did you leave your earthquake preparedness bag in your backpack?” When G nodded, Joshua asked, “Can you fetch it for us? I think we might need some of the tools.” The teen dashed off.

“Why do you want an earthquake bag?” Willem asked. Joshua faced him, shading his eyes with one hand. Behind them both, Orris led the teleporter to a table one row over, holding her elbow as she eased, shivering, into a chair. Despite the movement, she barely slowed the spoon delivering bite after bite of lemon gelato.
Read more... )

Poll: Poetry Themes for Late 2017

Jul. 24th, 2017 01:35 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poll invites audience feedback about themes proposed for the Poetry Fishbowl dates in late 2017. Everyone is eligible to vote in this poll. I will keep it open until at least Monday night, and then I need to close it so I can post the advance announcement on Tuesday.

The structure uses checkboxes. There are 38 themes after condensing similar ones and dropping things we've already covered. You may vote for as many themes as you would enjoy prompting/sponsoring in a fishbowl. I recommend that you don't vote for ALL of them, so as to help narrow down to favorites.

Read and vote! )

Deborah A. Miranda, Bad Indians, 2012

Jul. 23rd, 2017 10:54 pm
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[personal profile] yatima posting in [community profile] 50books_poc
Bad Indians opens with a line so good I'm angry I didn't write it myself: "CALIFORNIA IS A STORY. California is many stories." Deborah Miranda is a member of the Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen Nation, and this angry, loving book takes a knife to all the lazy and superficial versions of the California story. Of the history unit all Californian fourth graders (including my own two daughters) are required to take, Miranda writes: "[T]he Mission Unit is all too often a lesson in imperialism, racism, and Manifest Destiny."

A nonlinear collage of prose, poetry, pictures, transcriptions of interviews and more, Bad Indians can be hard to follow, but the effort pays off when the events of Miranda's life take their place in a precisely drawn and nuanced historical context. "The original acts of colonization and violence broke the world, broke our hearts, broke the connection between soul and flesh. For many of us, this trauma happens again in each generation," she writes. And: "I love my father. I hate my father. He died alone, in a hospice facility."

This book is essential reading for anyone who cares about the indigenous peoples of California, their present and their possible futures. Strong content warning for descriptions physical and sexual abuse of children, among many other horrors.

Comic for July 24, 2017

Jul. 24th, 2017 11:59 pm
[syndicated profile] dilbert_feed
Dilbert readers - Please visit Dilbert.com to read this feature. Due to changes with our feeds, we are now making this RSS feed a link to Dilbert.com.

Done this week (20170716Su - 22Sa)

Jul. 23rd, 2017 10:12 pm
mdlbear: the positively imaginary half of a cubic mandelbrot set (Default)
[personal profile] mdlbear

It's been a stressful week. The worst thing to happen, of course, was Jordin Kare's death on Wednesday. Friday we went down to Seattle both to check on the apartment, and to look for a kitten at Cat City. There were some wonderful ones, but they were all on hold. We went on a wild cat chase up to Lynnwood, only to find that the kitten we'd wanted to meet had been adopted while we were on the road.

The second pod was unloaded yesterday, mostly using hired muscle. It filled an appalling amount of space in the garage (I set up the plastic shelves down the center, and there are piles (mostly of book boxes) next to it. So there's that.) I had a bit of a meltdown this morning upacking mostly kitchen stuff, including the Peter Rabbit plate that I'd had as a kid, and realizing that we didn't have nearly enough room for even the reduced amount of stuff we brought, and concerned about money, and, and, and,... The usual stuff that happens when the brain weasels go out to play with the black dog.

We currently have two boxes of stuff to give away, one for my daughter who has just gotten engaged, and a largeish pile for G.

However, despite the stress, our first full week here has mostly been pretty good. Colleen's new caregiver, G", is working out quite well. (Glenn is G; our previous housekeeper, Giselle, was G'. This one is named Gina, so, ... After her I'm switching to subscripts.) Molly, our Chevy Bolt, is finally getting fully charged every day or two. (I am somewhat amused by the fact that she sends me a text when she's done charging. Molly is not amused by being mistaken for a wallboard anchor.)

Our beds are here, but we're waiting until after the new floor is in (Tuesday) to set them up, since moving them would involve taking them apart and setting them up again -- not worth it.

Our cats are at least not fighting; we're still keeping them separate until we can (hopefully) re-introduce them. We've bought a couple of Feliway pheromone diffusers - one for the main area of the house, and one for the room we plan to use for the re-introduction.

I have also replaced the ionization fire detector nearest the kitchen with a photoelectric one. Ionization detectors are sensitive to open flames, and we have a gas stove. Bad combination.

Notes & links, as usual )

I have always been a picker

Jul. 23rd, 2017 09:09 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
I used to pick at my scabs until they bled, and then pick at them again once they healed up. I used to pick at peeling paint - I've mostly stopped that habit. But what I really like to do, really really, is get the peeling bark on trees that exfoliate like that. I've been known to cross the street and then stop for five minutes at a time to get at the London Plane trees on my block.

If I think about it much, when I think about it, I generally would attribute this sort of thing to being autistic. I mean, I'm sure there are plenty of people who aren't autistic who do this too, but probably not many who go out of their way to do it for fun. I could be wrong here, of course.

Which is where this gets interesting. I went out to bring my mother her coffee, and before I went in I spent a few minutes with our crape myrtle. And my mother said I was just like her mother.

My mother has a very complicated relationship with me and autism. On the one hand, she swears she knew when I was a small infant. On the other hand, she is eager to downplay any signs of autism that I might ever bring up - especially if they're traits shared with anybody in the family other than her father, who really was undeniably autistic. Either she denies that the traits exist, or she denies that they're quite strong, or she denies that they have anything to do with autism whatsoever. (There are some things she can't do this to, like the topographical agnosia, but otherwise she gives it the good ol' college try!)

So for her to criticize what I'm pretty sure is an autistic trait, and attribute it to her mother instead of her father - well, I could've used this as a segue into my ongoing attempts to speak with her on the subject of the broader autistic phenotype, assortative mating, and our family. But given recent events, I decided instead to talk about exfoliating bark and how I'm sure the reduction of dead bark will decrease the risk of a forest fire in our backyard.
[syndicated profile] allthingslinguistic_feed

There were 15 participants at the institute editathon in Kentucky, and another 8 participants who joined us remotely from three locations, for a total of 23 people. Collectively, this group created or worked on 34 articles - 13 about people, 8 about languages, and 13 about topics and organizations in linguistics, and also sorted over 85 linguistics-related articles for stub status.  

Thanks to the institute organizers at Kentucky for putting the editathon on the schedule and arranging the room, as well as Kristen Syrett and Claire Bowern for organizing local lingwiki events at Rutgers and Yale. 

Here’s a detailed “How do I decide what to edit?” guide that I put on the whiteboard. 

  1. Do you work on an understudied language or dialect? –> Edit that!
  2. Are you a native speaker of a language other than English? –>  Edit its Wikipedia! (Maybe translate an article from English)
  3. Do you want to get to know the field better? –> Find a notable linguist who doesn’t have a biographical article yet and make one, especially of a female linguist, linguist of colour, or other underrepresented linguist. Make sure that your article includes how this person meets Wikipedia’s notability criteria for academics with a citation before you hit “save” the first time!
  4. Looking for tiny, unloved articles to edit? –> Google “linguistics stubs” 
  5. Feel like you don’t know enough linguistics to help? –> Try stub sorting using the guide at bit.ly/lingwikistub 

If you participated in any of the editathons but don’t see your article on here, just put it in bit.ly/lingwikisurvey and I’ll update the list. You can also check out the slides at bit.ly/lingwiki if you want advice on how to edit for linguists, or go to wikiedu.org if you’re thinking of assigning Wikipedia editing as a class assignment.

Here’s a list of articles edited. Feel free to check them out and see what else you can add!

People (13)

Languages (8)

Topics (13)

incandescens: (Default)
[personal profile] incandescens
I really wish I didn't have to go to work tomorrow.

Oh well. Just eight more working days, then holiday. (IE, Thursday next week.)

I will have to try not to count down the days too obviously...

---

“The dragons and the Fae are never going to be that close. Even if their cultures permitted it, they can’t tolerate each others’ worlds.” Prutkov conveniently ignored the fact that earlier he’d been suggesting they could ally closely enough to dispose of the Library. “There’s a place for us in the middle. We’re seeing the start of it now. We’re the dealmakers, the peacekeepers. We can have a real influence over them this way.” He looked Irene straight in the eyes. “Have you ever wondered what our ultimate purpose might be? Maybe we were meant to keep the peace by holding the reins on both sides. If they trust us, then we can persuade them separately to work with us. We can use this opportunity, Irene. We can use them. I’ve seen the records of your work with Kai while he was your apprentice. I know you understand what I mean.” His voice was confiding now, coaxing, encouraging. He leaned forward with the air of one sharing an intimacy. “Both sides are bound by their nature. We’re human. We can be more than that. The Library can grow. It can keep the peace rather than just steal books around the edges of creation. But for that to happen, they have to depend on us. They have to trust us. They have to need us.”
elf: Anime-ish version of elf: long cyan hair, glasses (Anime me)
[personal profile] elf
Nice ending to the month. Also, nice topic for today - tomorrow I start the new job, so a moment to reflect on self-identity is not a bad idea.

Bitch | Out of Control | Everybody's Moon | One More Time to Live | I'm Going to Go Back There Someday | Cloudy | No Rain | Live to Tell | Kiss Off | It Just Won't Quit

I bought this one when it was on the charts; still have the album on vinyl. )

Meme list

I have rehomed the kittens

Jul. 23rd, 2017 07:29 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
It was a little abrupt, but with all this that's going on I simply couldn't wait any longer. I'm just happy I didn't have to leave them at a shelter. I really think individual care is best for them right now - and that was what they weren't getting from me recently. (Also, boy, those kittens ate a lot, and produced a lot of poop as well! Two small kittens, and they were going through three or four cans of cat food today! The larger size, too, not the mini size.)

They went to a vet before going to their new foster home, and according to the update I got they are in comparatively great health - no FIV, no feline leukemia, and mostly recovered from earlier infection. Unfortunately, the one eye will not improve much from how it is now (there seems to have been some trauma, not just an infection), but the vet said it shouldn't affect her too much either. That's all we can hope for, and not that surprising.

Is a Bullet Journal Worth It?

Jul. 23rd, 2017 07:12 pm
noelfigart: (Default)
[personal profile] noelfigart

Originally published at Noel Lynne Figart. You can comment here or there.

I spend a little too much time on A Certain Social Media site where someone asked, “Is a Bullet Journal Worth it?” I passed on answering that question because I did not have a clear response. However, as of today, I filled up a notebook that I use for my Bullet Journal and spent an instructive hour migrating the material I still need from the old journal to the new one.

As I am doing so, I can answer an emphatic, “Yes!”

I have a couple of… I dunno if I’d call them flaws, exactly, but maybe… worries? Ideas that gnaw at me from time to time?

I worry that I am lazy. I also worry that I am wasting my life and being too caught up in the pleasures of the present to accomplish anything or move forward in any real way. I also don’t necessarily have the world’s most accurate memory.

This could be a perfect storm for self-doubt and frenetic, but useless, action.

You know how you might have a mental list of things you always mean to get around to, but never do? Little things, but that you think would either be cool to do or might improve your life. You get caught up in the urgency of the day and… well, you don’t do them.

I’m finding that for me, a Bullet Journal is preventing that.

For years, I’ve meant to have at least a few seasonal or monthly themed decorations around the house. Is it a big deal or important in the grand scheme of things? Absolutely not. But it’s a little thing that might make me happy or make me conscious of the passing of the year.

I now have at least a table runner and seasonal theme for each month for my dining room table. I’ve meant to do something like that for years and never really got around to it because I let time get away from me. This year, I’ve spend some time each month thinking about it, and getting a few decorations together so that I will have a different dining room table decoration for each month.

There are also projects of other sorts I’ve been doing or meaning to do. For instance, my Support and Defend series. Because of a tragedy in my life, and finding it difficult to think or write, yes, it went on hiatus for awhile. But I had not only the project in my Bullet Journal, but a clear outline of where I was in the project.

In going through the last nine months or so, I realize that this system is not only helping me keep on track for what I intend to do, but when I feel like I’m doing nothing, wasting my life or anything of the sort, I have a real day-to-day record of not only what I have done, but how much of it was things I’d always been meaning to do, but hadn’t been organized enough accomplish.

I like it better than a work to-do list or even some of the other organizational systems out there because it’s a good system to record the events of the day as well as the accomplishments. It’s meant to have notes about how you’d been doing that day that you can do in a short and easy-to-remember format that might be more difficult to analyze as a whole over a longer period of time than a diary.

Are there things I’d failed to accomplish? Well, yeah. It’s kind of hard to write a book about little girls when the granddaughter you’d intended to dedicate it to dies. So, no, it’s not that I necessarily accomplish everything I mean to. But it keeps me from spiraling and focusing only on the losses or failures. They happen, and they need to be recorded, but what also needs to be recorded are the good things that have happened as well as the achievements. It keeps me from dwelling on the negative or being falsely positive but is useful to get a realistic picture of what my life really looks like.

The state of Augmented Reality

Jul. 23rd, 2017 09:27 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
Five years ago I had a disagreement with a friend over whether this article was being overly pessimistic about augmented reality and whether we'd have "hard" AR soon.

Five years later, and this is the state of the art:


Which is, I totally admit, a very neat tech demo. But it's not "there" yet. The FOV is too small, and you can see the real world through it. Although, to be fair, most of the time the real world isn't _that_ distracting, you're definitely not going to be able to "see Victorian gas lamps in place of normal lights" or "have a real Coke can that you want to turn into an AR Pepsi can by drawing a Pepsi logo over the Coke logo".

Ah well, I'll make a note to come back in five years time and see where we are then!
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 11:56

When reading a contemporary werewolf story, generally one’s first thought isn’t “I love the multi-layered allegorical resonances,” but that’s what I came away with from Lundoff’s Silver Moon (originally published 2012 by Lethe Press but now reissued as one of the initial offerings of Queen of Swords Press).

Becca Thornton’s quiet life in the rural town of Wolf’s Point seems likely to be troubled only by the occasional tiresome contact from her ex-husband until three experiences intersect at once: the first stirrings of menopause, an unexpected attraction to the woman next door, and turning into a werewolf. Fortunately, the local women’s club is there to walk her through her lycanthropic initiation into their not-so-secret inner circle. Wolf’s Point has a long tradition of calling on women of a certain age to join the supernatural protectors of the town and its surrounds.

Becca is distracted from her uncertainty about this new stage of her life (heck, about all three new stages) by the incursion of a cult-like group of werewolf hunters, though their methods and opinions are more suggestive of gay conversion “therapy”--a parallel that is no more likely to be coincidence than any of the other thematic resonances.

Lundoff’s writing style is delightfully smooth and transparent, letting the story itself take the wheel. She evokes both the delights and annoyances of small town life--especially for a character who will be a newcomer however long she lives there--and mirrors them in the struggle to integrate into the alien dynamics of a werewolf pack that Becca seems to have had no choice in joining. This makes the thriller-style plot involving “conversion therapy” entirely believable as Becca is tempted by the possibility of “being normal again”. Conversely, the romantic subplot never raises such questions, only the standard anxieties around an unexpected attraction and the complexities of exploring it when everything else in your life is turned upside down.

I liked the overall pacing and how the various plot strands, both dramatic and humorous, were braided together. In an era when the “sexy dom/sub werewolf soulmate” plot seems to have taken over shapeshifter fiction, Silver Moon is a breath of fresh air: just a complex personal story of a woman going through The Changes. All of them.

Major category: 
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
93.5 °F - Feels Like 106 °F

Just spent a half hour outside, and came in dripping. Ugh.

I was picking the grape tomatoes, squash, collards, and some of the popcorn. The popcorn is a mixture of strains, so every cob is a surprise. Some are much like this "glass gem" corn. Regrettably, pollination wasn't ideal, so there are lots of half populated cobs. Still, given everyone's dismissal of growing corn without a fortress around it, i'm delighted.

I ordered a dehydrator, so the large number of squash doesn't intimidate me. And now i kinda wish for exponential tomatoes, but they don't seem to be coming -- unless i want to pick green and let them ripen in the house. Which is very tempting.

Yesterday i spend outside 10 to noon doing a burn. Most of the time i spent running the hose over myself to keep cool while watching the fire. Usually i keep gathering debris, but not yesterday. I did do some weeding in the shade.

--== ∞ ==--

Christine had what seems like an elephant event last night. But maybe it was just life.

Carrie continues to negotiate bed space with the cats. Turning her back to them is the best thing she's learned so far. They know how to stand up to her when she confronts them, but a big dog back?

transformation

Jul. 23rd, 2017 11:46 am
kore: (Default)
[personal profile] kore
via [personal profile] laurashapiro -- the third vid is by [personal profile] kuwdora:






"The Power (Sense8)"


Bonus (the original vocal sampled on the song ((at 3:00 in)) before Laurie Penny rerecorded it):

Sunday roadkill report

Jul. 23rd, 2017 02:56 pm
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

Second raccoon corpse up near that cafe, smaller size. Friday's version still lay as comparison. Don't know where the cleanup crew was -- coyotes satiated?

Beach peas have joined the floral assortment. Checked milkweed at water stops, but found no evidence of monarch caterpillar munching.

Beautiful day in the neighborhood, still in the 60s F when I started the ride, 72 F now. Little wind. Rode upriver to my eagle overlook with, alas, no eagles, then down the other side and back into the hills. Did not die.

35.55 miles, 3:05:13

[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 10:59

I picked up this collection after seeing mention of the author’s novel Mask of the Highwaywoman, and seeing that it had the original shorter version of the same story (since the novel isn’t yet available for iBooks). I’m always looking for lesbian historical fiction that reaches farther back than the 20th century. Magic and Romance doesn’t have a focused theme (other than lesbian protagonists) and only four of the eight stories fall in my historical/fantasy target interest. The other four (In Rhythm: A ballroom dancing romance, Is She?: An on-campus student rom-com, Reason to Stay: A teen romance, and Delicious: A New Year’s Eve tale of food and infatuation -- and, yes, the genre-descriptive subtitles are part of the story titles) are contemporary romance and I’ll confess that I skimmed them lightly.

Enthralled: A dark vampire hunter story follows the usual conventions of the modern erotic vampire vs. vampire hunter story, with the protagonist infiltrating the lair of a vampire queen to rescue the object of her affection. The story veers away from being a rescue-the-damsel adventure at the climax when the protagonist’s understanding of what’s going on is turned inside out. A dark and violent story for those who enjoy charging single-handedly into danger.

The Lady Edris and the Kingdom in a Cave: A tale inspired by Arthurian legends also turns the protagonist’s initial understanding upside down, but is more of a traditional quest-and-rescue-the-damsel scenario. Edris is on a quest to seek assistance against the plague in her homeland from the sorceress-queen of Northgales, their traditional enemy. But the queen has other ideas for the female knight who has penetrated her enchanted realm--ideas that involve the queen’s bed. A deep familiarity with the themes and tropes of Arthurian legend shines through, though the plot feels like the summary of a role-playing game, where the character passes through a sequence of tests and challenges to emerge victorious with the McGuffin and the girl.

Mask of the Highwaywoman: The short-story that became a novel is the story that led me to pick this up in the first place. The plot itself follows the usual formula for highwaywoman romance stories: our heroine’s coach is stopped by a masked highwayman (with or without accomplices) who betrays a brief sympathy or erotic interest in the heroine, but takes a piece of sentimental jewelry from her. The highwaywoman uses returning the jewelry as an excuse for another meeting in which sparks fly, and... Well, presumably what happens next is in the expanded version of the story.

The Black Hound: A romantic gothic horror distills down the platonic ideal of a gothic novel. Our impoverished heroine has come to a lonely, sinister mansion to be the companion of a tyrannical distant relative. On being warned not to wander the woods as night, of course she does so, and barely escapes an encounter with The Black Hound. Curses, nightmares, and supernatural events come to a head as our heroine takes comfort in the arms of her employer’s lady’s maid. A forced separation, another flight through the haunted woods with the hound in pursuit, and a bloody denouement that...well, that would be giving away whether this turns our to be gothic horror or gothic romance.

I liked the story premises and how they dodged around some of the usual formulas, but the writing style was often choppy and too reliant on short declarative sentences and long passages of dialogue. I’m always hoping for something a bit more lyrical. The impression of a choppy style also comes from the stories being broken up into short chapters (as short as 300-400 words), sometimes breaking in the middle of a scene. Murphy has the potential to turn out some very enjoyable historical and fantastic fiction with a bit more work on the technical side and I will probably try out the expanded version of Mask of the Highwaywoman to see if it’s addressed some of these weak spots.

Major category: 

Poem: "Boston Pride"

Jul. 23rd, 2017 12:06 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Two smiling women; Kelly is blonde and Dale is brunette (walking the beat)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is spillover from the July 4, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired and sponsored by [personal profile] technoshaman. It also fills the "lesbian" square in my 5-29-17 card for the Pride Bingo fest. This poem belongs to the series Walking the Beat.

Read more... )

new Penric impending

Jul. 23rd, 2017 10:00 am
[syndicated profile] lois_mcmaster_bujold_feed
I am pleased to report that I have finished the first draft of a new Penric & Desdemona novella. (For that peculiar value of "finished" that means, "still dinking till it's pulled from the writer's twitchy hands.")

Title will be "Penric's Fox"

Length, at this moment, is around 37,400 words. It is more-or-less a sequel to "Penric and the Shaman", taking place about eight or nine months after that story.

Final editing and formatting, arranging for cover art to send it out into the world nicely dressed, etc., will take some unknown amount of time and eyeball-endurance, but e-pub will likely happen in August.

My computer file tells me I started typing the opening on March 3rd, but of course there was lead-up to that. It is, in general, hard to tell or remember when a project segues over from "notion" to "planning", although the notion had been with me for some time. Story notions are like a collection of vaguely related objects rattling around in a box; planning starts when some key object that connects them all drops in, and things suddenly get interesting.

Ta, L.

posted by Lois McMaster Bujold on July, 23

Moment of Silence: Maryam Mirzakhani

Jul. 23rd, 2017 11:28 am
ysabetwordsmith: (moment of silence)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Famous mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani has passed away.  She came from Iran and won her first medal in a
mathematics competition in 1994.

Dear Coronator

Jul. 23rd, 2017 06:59 pm
extrapenguin: Photo of horse's head (Default)
[personal profile] extrapenguin
Hi, I'm [archiveofourown.org profile] ExtraPenguin. Here's my Coronation Ceremony letter! Likes, DNWs, and prompts beneath the cut.

Read more... )

Hugo shortlist: Novels

Jul. 23rd, 2017 04:50 pm
emperor: (Default)
[personal profile] emperor
I didn't really have enough time to get through the Hugo reading this year, but I did manage to read enough of the shortlisted novels that I voted for them. I voted thus:

  1. A Closed and Common Orbit; I read The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet shortly before the shortlist was announced (and really enjoyed it), which perhaps biased me in favour of this one. That did mean that I knew how one of the story arcs was going to finish, but it was still an engaging read, and I thought the way the author approached neurodiversity was gently but well done
  2. Ninefox Gambit; I would not normally go for military SF, and it did take me a while to get into this, but the author has created a fascinating world, and I really want to find out how the series progresses. Despite being the first in a series, this had a decent narrative arc of its own
  3. All the Birds in the Sky; I wanted to like this, but didn't in the end. The chapters were a bit abrupt, it sometimes felt like it was just being clever, and the magic felt a bit deus ex machina in places. I also found the (inevitable?) romance plot pretty weak. Also, the ending was a bit disappointing.
  4. Too Like the Lightning; I didn't like this at all. The narrator was infuriating, the style affected, the continued harping on about gender irksome, and it didn't even try to come to a natural close, it just stopped. I know there's a sequel, but really.


I didn't read Death's End, because I hated 3-Body Problem; I didn't read The Obelisk Gate because I didn't manage to get hold of a copy (the kindle voter packet only had an excerpt).
lebateleur: Sweet Woodruff (Default)
[personal profile] lebateleur
...and so they are here. I wrote a big tl:dr post outlining the decade of WWE storylines that culimated in Tuesday's squee, but realising that that was a little much to inflict on the unsuspecting, here are the Cliff's Notes. )

これで以上です。
jesse_the_k: harbor seal's head with caption "seal of approval" (Approval)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k posting in [community profile] metaquotes
Zombie cheerleader says: "Rah rah rust!"

Zombie High motto is: "If we can't win using our brains then we'll use your brains!" ;-)


Context is a Lego cheerleader in a graveyard, among other topics

buttonbush

Jul. 23rd, 2017 09:31 am
asakiyume: (glowing grass)
[personal profile] asakiyume
The Ashley reservoir is now one of my go-to places to take people when they visit. I took my old college friend and her husband there, and learned that the water-loving plant that I had thought looked very mangrove-y is buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), which grows up and down the Atlantic coast and as far inland as the Mississippi, and is indeed a species in the mangrove biome!

Buttonbush

button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

Yesterday I took [personal profile] osprey_archer there (and we read aloud to each other--so much fun), and lo and behold, the buttonbush was in bloom! I didn't have a camera, so she obliged me with a photo:

Buttonbush in flower, by [personal profile] osprey_archer



The flowers look like how pollen looks under a scanning electron microscope:

Buttonbush flowers....

buttonbush flowers

Pollen, much magnified:



(source)

Or, um... like an influenza virus...



(source)

It smells nice, though, and bees and butterflies love it. AS DO I.


elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
This morning i started reading about bail justice. I was aware Kamala Harris & Rand Paul -- a name pairing that really gets my attention -- had introduced legislation, and was aware of SONG's (Southerners On New Ground) work in May. So when Song sent this call, i went to read up on the bill -- and found even more information about bail justice.

Across the Southeast, we intend to initiate Free From Fear campaigns to end the practice of cash bail. We see bail outs as an ongoing tactic to build a base, to expose the crisis of cash bail and the beast that is the criminal-legal system, to change hearts and minds, to make real and material impacts on the lives of our people, and to build power. We can think of no better way to commemorate the history of Black August than to bail out as many Black women, broadly defined, and Black trans people free across the South as we can.


The "report" generated from my citation tool Zotero, is below, and you can skim the notes or follow the links for more.

Readings )
  • A Labor of Love: Black Mama's Bail Out Action + Reflection

    Type Web Page
    Author ignitekindred
    URL http://southernersonnewground.org/2017/05/a-labor-of-love/
    Date 2017-05-16T14:50:04-04:00
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM
    Abstract [CLICK HERE FOR SPANISH TRANSLATION] 1. Putting our organizing practice into action. At SONG, our organizing practice has long been based in love, longing, and desire across class, race, gender and community. This action allowed us to demonstrate our collective belief in a shared destiny with the dreams, demands and hopes of Black women in all of our varieties at the center. Our collective cup overflowed locally and regionally with gift cards, bouquets, clothes, services offered by local practitioners, prime ...
    Website Title Southerners On New Ground
    Short Title A Labor of Love
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Defendants Can’t Be Jailed Solely Because of Inability to Post Bail, Judge Says

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Richard A. Oppel Jr
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/us/chicago-bail-reform.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-07-17
    Section U.S.
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract An order issued by Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans of Cook County, Ill., highlights a contentious national debate surrounding the ability of defendants to post bail.
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Chicago (Ill)
    • Prisons and Prisoners

    Notes:

    • In April [2017], for example, a federal judge in Houston ruled that Harris County could not keep those arrested on misdemeanor charges in jail because they could not afford bail. The judge, Lee H. Rosenthal, who was appointed by the first President Bush, found that the system disproportionately affected indigent residents and violated “equal protection rights against wealth-based discrimination.”

      Tags:

      • Bail

    Attachments

  • Getting Rid of Bail Is Only the Start

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Ginia Bellafante
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/01/nyregion/getting-rid-of-bail-is-only-the-start.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-06-01
    Section N.Y. / Region
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract Using conflict resolution and social services to keep low-level offenders out of the courts should be the next wave in criminal justice reform.
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Brooklyn Community Bail Fund
    • Brooklyn (NYC)
    • Brown, David O
    • Law and Legislation
    • Poverty
    • Robberies and Thefts
  • Opinion | Kamala Harris and Rand Paul: To Shrink Jails, Let’s Reform Bail

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Kamala D. Harris
    Author Rand Paul
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/20/opinion/kamala-harris-and-rand-paul-lets-reform-bail.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-07-20
    Section Opinion
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:52 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract Low-risk defendants shouldn’t be detained before trial just because they can’t afford it.
    Short Title Opinion | Kamala Harris and Rand Paul
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:52 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:46:32 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Browder, Kalief (1993-2015)
    • Discrimination
    • Prisons and Prisoners
  • Pretrial Justice Institute

    Type Web Page
    URL http://www.pretrial.org/
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:27:47 AM
    Abstract The ProblemThe American system of bail is fundamentally incapable of doing the job we expect from it. Those with money—regardless of where they got the money or their danger to the community or victims—can purchase their freedom while poor defendants … Continue reading →
    Website Title Pretrial Justice Institute
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:27:47 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:46:10 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Selling Off Our Freedom: How Insurance Corporations Have Taken Over Our Bail System

    Type Web Page
    URL https://www.aclu.org/report/selling-our-freedom-how-insurance-corporations-have-taken-over-our-bail-system
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM
    Abstract Selling Off Our Freedom: How Insurance Corporations Have Taken Over Our Bail System is a joint report by Color of Change and the American Civil Liberties Union’s Campaign for Smart Justice that documents how the for-profit bail industry fuels mass incarceration and perpetuates racial inequalities.
    Website Title American Civil Liberties Union
    Short Title Selling Off Our Freedom
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Type Statute
    Name of Act S. 1593: A bill to provide grants to States and Indian tribes to reform their criminal justice system to encourage the replacement of the use of payment of secured money bail as a condition of pretrial release in criminal cases, and for other purposes.
    Short Title Pretrial Integrity and Safety Act
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:36:42 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:37:42 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail

    Notes:

    • From NYT editorial, re Pretrial Integrity and Safety Act


      ...Excessive bail disproportionately harms people from low-income communities and communities of color. The Supreme Court ruled in Bearden v. Georgia in 1983 that the Constitution prohibits “punishing a person for his poverty,” but that’s exactly what this system does. Nine out of 10 defendants who are detained cannot afford to post bail, which can exceed $20,000 even for minor crimes like stealing $105 in clothing....
      ...black and Latino men respectively pay 35 percent and 19 percent higher bail than white men....

      This isn’t just unjust. It also wastes taxpayer dollars. People awaiting trial account for 95 percent of the growth in the jail population from 2000 to 2014, and it costs roughly $38 million every day to imprison these largely nonviolent defendants. That adds up to $14 billion a year.

      Bail is supposed to ensure that the accused appear at trial and don’t commit other offenses in the meantime. But research has shown that low-risk defendants who are detained more than 24 hours and then released are actually less likely to show up in court than those who are detained less than a day.

      ...

      Kentucky and New Jersey, for instance, have shifted from bail toward personalized risk assessments that analyze factors such as criminal history and substance abuse. These are better indicators of whether a defendant is a flight risk or a threat to the public and ought to be held without bail.

      Colorado and West Virginia have improved pretrial services and supervision, such as using telephone reminders so fewer defendants miss court dates and end up detained.

      These nudges work. Over the second half of 2006, automated phone call reminders in Multnomah County in Oregon, resulted in 750 people showing up in court who otherwise may have forgotten their date.

      ...

      The Pretrial Justice Institute, an organization that works to change unfair and unjust pretrial practices, estimates that bail reform could save American taxpayers roughly $78 billion a year. More important, it would help restore Americans’ faith in our justice system.

    Attachments

Chill out, dude

Jul. 23rd, 2017 07:45 am
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley
Air temperature 51 F and calm at breakfast, up to 57 F now, scattered clouds, dew point 44 F. Welcome break from the heat and humidity.

Bike ride on schedule.

I have a tool for that, too

Jul. 23rd, 2017 05:32 am
supergee: (kangaroo)
[personal profile] supergee
Massachusetts wants to put you in jail and steal your car for having a secret compartment you might use for ritually unclean substances.

Thanx to Avedon's Sideshow.

Help! Older Fantasy book! (FOUND)

Jul. 23rd, 2017 04:54 am
yenven: (Default)
[personal profile] yenven posting in [community profile] findthatbook
*Edit: The book is Sorcery Rising (Fools Gold #1) by Jude Fisher*

There was a book I read in high school, maybe 10+ years ago, and I'm struggling to recall the author and title.
I don't remember the main plot or character names, just a few scenes and descriptions the author used.
It's an older book and it's cover style was similar to other older books I read at the time like Through Wolf's Eyes by Jane Lindskold and The Outstretched Shadow by Mercedes Lackey and James Mallory, therefore the book I'm searching for might've been published in the early 2000s like those 2 books.

The book had a hardcover and I think it showed a town by the sea with a ship to the left (but my memory might be off)

The first thing I remember is that I think the story starts with a town by the sea. There is a mention of the first strawberries of the year being brought to the market, that people will be clamoring for them. The author compares the fruit to rubies and then says they are nearly as valuable.

The story changes perspective and kinda jumps around. I remember it being told from a guys perspective and then sometimes by a girl.
I also remember the author describing in passing how one character witnesses a small figure of a woman pinned by two guys while a third rapes her.

I also remember there were these traveler people like gypsies that came during that time of year to perform and entertain. That later hide a mysterious woman who is described as very beautiful with nearly white hair, creamy skin, etc. There was a guy who desired her a lot and wanted her as a wife but the gypsies kept him away from her until near the end of the story where we find out she's the sister of someone (either a god or a king, someone important but I can't remember).
I faintly recollect that the gypsies give the male protagonist something to help him out but can't do anything more to help him. I think he might've been one of them but he was orphaned and I think he has magic too.

Lastly the scene that I can recall vividly is when the girl protagonist is injured, her hands and side of her face are burned. Later this old woman heals her using fire and a knife to "carve" and reshape her fingers since the fire fused them together. While the old woman is doing this another character shows up, sees the knife, freaks and kills the old woman. Her last words to him are something like "don't you know it's bad luck to interrupt a healing." The old woman dies and the girls burns are healed along with her 'new' fingers.

--If anyone can help me find this book I would be so grateful. I'm sorry if it's not a lot to work with!

"Close enough for jazz"

Jul. 23rd, 2017 03:13 am
rosefox: Me snuggling a giant teddy bear, entirely contented. (sleeping)
[personal profile] rosefox
Vacation to-do list/wishlist summary: not too bad! Especially given that today was totally eaten by stressful unexpected circumstances. (Everyone is fine now.)

Things without deadlines (fun):

* Watch Voltron: Legendary Defender and do some knitting
* Stroll in the Botanic Gardens (I didn't do this but did go read in the park near our house)
* Maybe steal the baby from daycare early one day and get extra baby time
* Read (three books! in one week!)
* Cook
* Lunch with my mom
* Sleeeeeeeep

Things without deadlines (productive):

* Shower and dress in real clothes every day (mostly)
* Tidy room enough for vacuuming
* Unpack
* Vacuum (well, I swept, but it's pretty clean underfoot now)
* Catch up on laundry
* Celebrate the 1st anniversary of Story Hospital (!)
* Call insurance company about that bill
* Call doctor's office about that prior auth
* Finish setting up Tinybeans
* Remake OT appointment for next week
* Do a family Readercon debrief/postmortem
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Defending Their Own
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 1 of
word count (story only): 1175


:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, and the Mercedes subset, while taking the “Road Trip” in an entirely new direction. ::


Pay Special Attention: People who have been profiting from human trafficking have parts of their reality (and sometimes their bodies) folded into several sharp points which may not match any previously known 'safe' configuration. ::




In the early morning, while most of the non-medical crew were setting up for breakfast, the decks felt as private as a car during a long, solo commute. To break that sense of isolation, the very first things put out were the three large wicker laundry baskets full of card and board games, along with a day pack full of pads of plain paper and a variety of pens, pencils and other drawing utensils.

Which is how, at just past six in the morning, Joshua found himself too antsy to even work out and up to his elbows in a 'simple' game of 'Draw and Release' along side a young woman in her late twenties whose boldy maroon hair had been shaved nearly to her scalp at the sides, but flopped in a long vee of bangs that rubbed against her cheekbone on her left. She swore a blue streak, tearing away the page she'd been working on, as the man in his fifties stroked his mostly-brown beard and mulled over his next turn. “Just make a move, young man, because Millie has won every game I've played against her in the last four visits here.”
Read more... )

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